Minnesota Safety Training Professionals 651-210-7717 

                                   Safety Training When and Where you need it

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MSHA TRAINING SAINT PAUL, MN

Posted on June 20, 2014 at 8:18 AM Comments comments (4)

OSHA 10 Hour General Industry & Construction

Posted on October 14, 2013 at 12:45 PM Comments comments (0)
OSHA 10 Hour training offered on a weekly basis in Saint Paul, Rochester, Duluth - all MN towns.

Upcoming safety classes

Posted on July 7, 2013 at 5:49 PM Comments comments (0)
 

OSHA 10 Class in Minneapolis

Posted on June 24, 2013 at 1:04 PM Comments comments (0)

Safety Training Classes

Posted on May 17, 2013 at 7:36 PM Comments comments (0)
 
 
 
Minnesota safety training professionals goes to all areas of Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin.
 
Heavy Equipment Operator Training,
49 Union Training,
Hydrogen Sulfide,
First aid Training,
OSHA 10 Hour,
Hazwoper Training,
Competent Person Trenching,
Competent Person Fall Protection,
Competent Person Confined Space,
Crane Rigging Certification,
Crane Signal Person,
Loader Training,
Telehandler Training,
Forklift Certification,
Safety Inspection,
Help With OSHA Fines,
Wheel Loader Training,
Dozer,
Backhoe
 
 
 
 
 
Saint Paul, Rochester, Duluth, Bloomington, Brooklyn Park, Plymouth, St. Cloud, Eagan, Woodbury, Maple Grove, Coon Rapids, Eden Prairie, Burnsville, Blaine, Lakeville, Minnetonka, Apple Valley,  Edina, St. Louis Park, Mankato, Moorhead, Maplewood, Shakopee, Richfield, Cottage Grove, Inver Grove Heights, Roseville, Andover, Brooklyn Center, Oakdale, Winona , Savage, Fridley, Owatonna, Shoreview
Austin, Chaska, White Bear Lake, Ramsey, Faribault, Champlin, Chanhassen, Prior Lake,  Elk River, Crystal
Hastings, Rosemount, New Brighton, Farmington, Golden Valley, New Hope, Lino Lakes, South St. Paul, Northfield, West St. Paul, Columbia Heights, Willmar, Forest Lake,  Stillwater, Albert Lea, Hopkins, Anoka, St. Michael, Red Wing, Hibbing, Sartell, Buffalo, Ham Lake, Robbinsdale, Hutchinson, Otsego,  Marshall, Bemidji,  Brainerd, Hugo, New Ulm, North Mankato, Fergus Falls, Monticello, Sauk Rapids, Worthington, Vadnais Heights, Mounds View, Cloquet, East Bethel, North St. Paul, St. Peter, Mendota Heights, Alexandria, Waconia, Grand Rapids, Fairmont, Big Lake, North Branch, Little Canada, Arden Hills, Waseca, Hermantown, Mound, Rogers, Virginia, Thief River Falls, Detroit Lakes, East Grand Forks,  Little Falls, St. Anthony, Cambridge, Lake Elmo, Oak Grove, Crookston, Wyoming, Mahtomedi, Baxter, Orono, Victoria, Shorewood, New Prague, St. Francis, Albertville, Belle Plaine, Waite Park, Litchfield, St. Joseph, Minnetrista, Spring Lake Park, International Falls, Stewartville, Kasson, Glencoe, Jordan, Delano,  La Crosse, Eau Claire, Somerset, Hudson, River Falls, Fargo, Superior, Ashland, Ironwood, Hayward, Rice Lake, Barron, Bloomer

Minnesota Safety Training

Posted on April 13, 2013 at 10:03 PM Comments comments (20)
Get your training done before spring comes! Safety Training for operators!!

Minnesota safety training professionals goes to all areas of Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Posted on January 21, 2013 at 7:58 PM Comments comments (0)
 

We serve all of Minnesota for safety training

Posted on January 21, 2013 at 7:43 PM Comments comments (0)
We go to all areas of Minnesota and Wisconsin.
 
 
Saint Paul, Rochester, Duluth, Bloomington, Brooklyn Park, Plymouth, St. Cloud, Eagan, Woodbury, Maple Grove, Coon Rapids, Eden Prairie, Burnsville, Blaine, Lakeville, Minnetonka, Apple Valley,  Edina, St. Louis Park, Mankato, Moorhead, Maplewood, Shakopee, Richfield, Cottage Grove, Inver Grove Heights, Roseville, Andover, Brooklyn Center, Oakdale, Winona , Savage, Fridley, Owatonna, Shoreview
Austin, Chaska, White Bear Lake, Ramsey, Faribault, Champlin, Chanhassen, Prior Lake,  Elk River, Crystal
Hastings, Rosemount, New Brighton, Farmington, Golden Valley, New Hope, Lino Lakes, South St. Paul, Northfield, West St. Paul, Columbia Heights, Willmar, Forest Lake,  Stillwater, Albert Lea, Hopkins, Anoka, St. Michael, Red Wing, Hibbing, Sartell, Buffalo, Ham Lake, Robbinsdale, Hutchinson, Otsego,  Marshall, Bemidji,  Brainerd, Hugo, New Ulm, North Mankato, Fergus Falls, Monticello, Sauk Rapids, Worthington, Vadnais Heights, Mounds View, Cloquet, East Bethel, North St. Paul, St. Peter, Mendota Heights, Alexandria, Waconia, Grand Rapids, Fairmont, Big Lake, North Branch, Little Canada, Arden Hills, Waseca, Hermantown, Mound, Rogers, Virginia, Thief River Falls, Detroit Lakes, East Grand Forks,  Little Falls, St. Anthony, Cambridge, Lake Elmo, Oak Grove, Crookston, Wyoming, Mahtomedi, Baxter, Orono, Victoria, Shorewood, New Prague, St. Francis, Albertville, Belle Plaine, Waite Park, Litchfield, St. Joseph, Minnetrista, Spring Lake Park, International Falls, Stewartville, Kasson, Glencoe, Jordan, Delano,  La Crosse, Eau Claire, Somerset, Hudson, River Falls, Fargo, Superior, Ashland, Ironwood, Hayward, Rice Lake, Barron, Bloomer

Hazwoper 8, Hazwoper 24, Hazwoper 40

Posted on January 21, 2013 at 6:06 PM Comments comments (0)
We do offer Hazwoper training!!!
 
8 Hour Refresher, 24 Hour & Hazwoper 40 Hour Training
HAZWOPER 8-hour Annual Refresher Classroom Training -Meets the Federal requirement for annual Hazwoper training, for those workers who are employed or visit hazardous work environments. All students must have previously enrolled in and completed the 24-hour or 40-hour HAZWOPER Training course. OSHA regulations, in 29 CFR 1910.120, requires employees and contractors who work with hazardous material to refresh their earlier Hazwoper safety training. This ensures that you will be better prepared to meet the demands and the potential dangers of not only working in and around hazardous work environments but also how to better protect both yourself and your workers that are around and even in these toxic sites.
HAZWOPER 8-hour First Responder 8-hour First Responder strives to train individuals who will be involved with Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER). HAZWOPER first responders at the operations level are individuals who respond to releases or potential releases of hazardous substances as part of the initial response to the site for the purpose of protecting nearby persons, property, or the environment from the effects of the release. They are trained to respond in a defensive fashion without actually trying to stop the release. Their function is to contain the release from a safe distance, keep it from spreading, and prevent exposures.
HAZWOPER 24-hour Training HAZWOPER 24 Hour Training is required for employees visiting an Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Operation mandated by the Government. This course covers broad issues pertaining to the hazard recognition at work sites. OSHA has developed the HAZWOPER program to protect the workers working at hazardous sites and devised extensive regulations to ensure their safety and health. This course, while identifying different types of hazards, also suggests possible precautions and protective measures to reduce or eliminate hazards at the work place.
HAZWOPER 40-hour Training While the introductory 24-hour training presents the fundamentals for HAZWOPER knowledge, the 40-Hour Training is for those individuals whose continued activities put them in contact, or potential contact with hazardous materials. Those workers who are involved in clean-up operations, voluntary clean-up operations, emergency response operations, and storage, disposal, or treatment of hazardous substances or uncontrolled hazardous waste sites are required by law to obtain this training.40 Hour Hazwoper Training Course covers the following topics: - OSHA Regulation Overview - Site Characterization - Hazard recognition - Toxicology - Hazard and Safety Analysis - Hazardous Chemical Awareness - Radiological Hazards - Respiratory Protection - Medical Surveillance - Personal Protective Equipment - Site Control - Decontamination - Air Monitoring - Confined Space Entry - Emergency Procedures - Material Sampling

Is computer based training acceptable for OSHA

Posted on December 10, 2012 at 7:07 PM Comments comments (0)
Question 1. What is OSHA's position on computer-based training programs for cognitive training?

Answer: In OSHA's view, self-paced, interactive computer-based training can serve as a valuable training tool in the context of an overall training program. However, use of computer-based training by itself would not be sufficient to meet the intent of most of OSHA's training requirements, in particular those of HAZWOPER. Our position on this matter is essentially the same as our policy on the use of training videos, since the two approaches have similar shortcomings. OSHA urges employers to be wary of relying solely on generic, "packaged" training programs in meeting their training requirements. For example, training under HAZWOPER includes site-specific elements and should also, to some degree, be tailored to workers' assigned duties.

Safety and health training involves the presentation of technical material to audiences that typically have not had formal education in technical or scientific disciplines, such as in areas of chemistry or physiology. In an effective training program, it is critical that trainees have the opportunity to ask questions where material is unfamiliar to them. In a computer-based program, this requirements may be providing a telephone hotline so that trainees will have direct access to a qualified trainer.

Equally mportant is the use of hands-on training and exercises to provide trainees with an opportunity to become familiar with equipment and safe practices in a non-hazardous setting. Many industrial operations, and in particular hazardous waste operations, can involve many complex and hazardous tasks. It is imperative that employees be able to perform such tasks safely. Traditional, hands-on training is the preferred method to ensure that workers are prepared to safely perform these tasks. The purpose of hands-on training, for example in the donning and doffing of personal protective equipment, is two-fold: first, to ensure that workers have an opportunity to learn by experience, and second, to assess whether workers have mastered the necessary skills. It is unlikely that sole reliance on a computer-based training program is likely to achieve these objectives.

Thus, OSHA believes that computer-based training programs can be used as part of an effective safety and health training program to satisfy OSHA training requirements, provided that the program is supplemented by the opportunity for trainees to ask questions of a qualified trainer, and provides trainees with sufficienthands-on experience.

Question 2. How will computer-based training be compared to required hour training as set forth in 1910.120?

Where OSHA has specified a required duration represents, in OSHA's view, the minimum amount of training that will be needed for most trainees to acquire the necessary basic skills. For the reasons stated above, OSHA does not believe that the use of computer-based training will, in the majority of cases, enable trainees to achieve competency in substantially less time than the required minimum duration for training. Therefore, the use of computer-based training will not relieve employers of their obligation to ensure that employees receive the minimum require amount of training specified under HAZWOPER and other OSHAstandards.

Question 3. Will a computer-based program's outline and development material suffice for conventional training material documentation?

Answer: OSHA standards, and HAZWOPER in particular, do not specify the kinds of materials that must be developed and maintained to document that a course meets the minimum requirements for course content. Employers may use whatever documentation is necessary to document the content of a training course.

Question 4. Will computer-based tracking of training competence levels be documentation enough for the training or will a hard copy, signed document be required?

Answer: OSHA standards that require training generally contain a requirement for the employer to maintain records of employee training; these records may be kept in any form deemed appropriate by the employer, so long as the records are readily accessible to the employer, employees and their representatives, and to OSHA. However, note that the HAZWOPER standard contains a unique requirement in that employees must be provided a certificate upon the successful completion of initial training; this is best accomplished by the use of hard copy.

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